Tag Archives: dewey decimal system

“Rockin’ the Wedge” – The Cheese Book

As I discovered during my last library visit, number 637 in the Dewey Decimal System is devoted exclusively to cheesemaking!  I was intrigued, so I picked up a very elegant-looking book called The Joy of Cheesemaking: The Ultimate Guide to Understanding, Making, and Eating Fine Cheese.  The first aspect of the book I really enjoyed was the elegant, sophisticated feeling it imparted, with both the cover and its description of “classic” cheeses I’d never even heard of.  The next thing I wanted to know, as I read impatiently through the introduction, was whether or not I could reasonably expect to make my own cheese.  Given enough money to spend on it, with this book I’d say the answer is yes. Continue reading

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My Kind of Cat

As soon as I finished reading Dewey: The Small-Town Library Cat Who Touched the World, I immediately jumped into the sequel (a good sign, I think!).  And in the introduction I came across the following quote, which really represented the first book to me: “People appreciate Spencer, Iowa.  They like our cornfields and architecture and they also like what we represent: simplicity, old-fashioned hard work, but also creativity, commitment, and love.” Continue reading

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“Unexpected Insights for Business and Life”

ClickClasses started today and neither of my classes seem too difficult.  Hopefully this means good things for my ability to continue blogging throughout the semester!  This evening I had time finish Click, my 006 book, and I thoroughly enjoyed it.  Like the author, I have to admit that I love data.  And this book describes a data-miner’s dream.  The author has information about the searches made and websites visited by 10 million users (!) and has demographic information for about a quarter of them. Continue reading

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The Art of Deception

The Art of Deception is written by a hacker (or, as he calls himself, a “social engineer”) and describes the ways in which hackers can exploit human nature to bypass security measures.  The book was hyped as being “like reading the climaxes of a dozen complex thrillers”, but I don’t think it lived up that hype.  Although I found it interesting to read about the clever ways hackers go about getting very classified information, it wasn’t exactly edge-of-your-seat reading. Continue reading

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Almost Forgotten Four

Welcome to the new year everyone! I’m currently visiting my boyfriend in sunny Atlanta, so I’m mostly postponing my resolution setting to when I won’t be wasting precious time with him 🙂  However, I am planning on doing a 52 week photography project where I take a picture a week all year.  To do that, I will be starting a new section on the blog, Photography Friday, where I will post each week’s picture.  I will also be participating in the Cannonball Read challenge to read and review books ( blog available here).  This will require me to do more detailed reviews than I’ve been doing so far.  Feel free to share your own resolutions in the comments! Continue reading

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I Can Haz Books?

My books came in!  I also stopped by the non-fiction section and picked up some books for the challenge:

005 – The Art of Deception – one of the very few books in this section I’d want to read all the way through, as most are tutorials for computer programs and programming.  This book is written by a hacker and describes the “most serious security weakness – human nature”.  Supposedly like reading a mystery novel.

006 – Click – this section includes books on “special computer methods”, mostly stuff on artificial intelligence.  Click describes the results of data-mining the information we share online, but seems less dry than that description makes it sounds.  Reminds me a little of Freakonomics – both authors search through seemingly unconnected data for conclusions about human nature.

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